Divine Comedy Autobiographical Journey In Dante’s Inferno

626 words - 3 pages

Dante’s Inferno - Autobiographical Journey

 

The Inferno is more than just a fictional story about someone traveling through the universe. It is actually more like an autobiographical journey of life through its author, Dante Alighieri’s eyes. Written in the early 1300s by a disgruntled Dante living in exile, he literally describes a man who has been trapped, and must find a way to escape. Allegorically, he’s telling us about the terrible moment of crisis that occurs in each one of our lives “when evil inside and outside of ourselves seems to block any hope for further constructive development”. Written originally as a long poem separated into cantos or songs, he basically wrote with the personal purpose of recording where all of the people he came in contact within his life, will go when they die. This could be one of three places; Hell, Purgatory, or Heaven. He went on to design specific, fitting punishments or rewards based on the life each person led. Dante then tied this all togethor and made himself a character that walks the entire length of the conceptualized universe. Due to the fact that Dante poured his heart and soul into his writing, there are many representations of his personal life and the time in which he lived, in this piece of literature.

            Whether they were someone that betrayed him in his political career or the girl that he fell in love with when he was 9 years old, he found a way to integrate them into the Inferno. As we noticed in this allegory, Dante considers trust and loyalty to be one of the most important human characteristics. He basically felt this way due to the point that he was betrayed and exiled away from his beloved homeland. It is because of this that he places...

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